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What Happens to People and What Happens to the Land is the Same Thing | Le Narcisssio, Nice

Curated by Chiara Nuzzi, the project What Happens to People and What Happens to the Land is the Same Thing explores the role of art in ecological emergence, investigating its intersections with environmental commitment, political ecology and indigenous knowledge in relation to our modernity. In this frame, the works by several artists develop different cosmologies in light of the specific topic of reconciliation, an approach facing a de-colonial sensibility in the contemporary engagement with art.

The project is thus divided in three different chapters covering in turn an evening of lectures and screening program where selected video works will establish new powerful relations and crucial questions, followed by a video exhibition, and concluded by a collective sound walk in a botanical garden on the French Riviera.

Curated by Chiara Nuzzi, screening works by Ursula Biemann & Paulo Tavares, the Karrabing Film Collective and Uriel Orlow.


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What the eyes cannot see | Kunsthaus Dresden

The exhibition What the eyes cannot see, the heart cannot feel is dedicated to the coexistence of humans with their natural environment. Around the world, landscapes and ecosystems have been and are still being changed by human interventions, while languages and cultural techniques have evolved in direct response to landscapes, plants and soils. Curated by Christiane Mennicke-Schwarz, Vincent Schier with work by Aline Baiana, Minia Biabiany, Kadija de Paula & Chico Togni in collaboration with FELL, Patricia Esquivias, Andreas Kempe, Antje Majewski, Silvia Noronha, Uriel Orlow, Lois Weinberger


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British Art Show 9 | Aberdeen Art Gallery

The British Art Show is a landmark touring exhibition that celebrates the vitality of recent art made in Britain. British Art Show 9 was developed at a precarious moment in Britain’s history that has brought politics of identity and nation, concerns of social, racial and environmental justice, and questions of agency to the centre of public consciousness. The artists presented in the exhibition respond in critical ways to this complex context; imagining more hopeful futures and exploring new modes of resistance.

BAS9 is curated by Irene Aristizábal and Hammad Nasar and includes work by over 40 artists.


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Extractive Zones | Museum der Kulturen Basel

Human-environment relations are radically changing through the interventions of extractive industries and knowledge technologies. Against this background, the exhibition tests the critical dialogue between contemporary art and museum artifacts. Curated by Liliana Gómez, in cooperation with the University of Zurich, University of Kassel and the Documenta Institute.


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