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What Happens to People and What Happens to the Land is the Same Thing | Le Narcisssio, Nice

Curated by Chiara Nuzzi, the project What Happens to People and What Happens to the Land is the Same Thing explores the role of art in ecological emergence, investigating its intersections with environmental commitment, political ecology and indigenous knowledge in relation to our modernity. In this frame, the works by several artists develop different cosmologies in light of the specific topic of reconciliation, an approach facing a de-colonial sensibility in the contemporary engagement with art.

The project is thus divided in three different chapters covering in turn an evening of lectures and screening program where selected video works will establish new powerful relations and crucial questions, followed by a video exhibition, and concluded by a collective sound walk in a botanical garden on the French Riviera.

Curated by Chiara Nuzzi, screening works by Ursula Biemann & Paulo Tavares, the Karrabing Film Collective and Uriel Orlow.


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Digital Ecologies Chapter One | SKLAD and The Ancient Bath, Center of Contemporary Art, Plovdiv

Art Today Association’s project “Digital Ecologies” is an exhibition that, by employing the means of art, is exploring the interaction between electronic technologies and urban environment in its complexity. The project will have two editions in 2018 and in 2019.

Operaismo Naturale: Ecology of the Event (27 July – 31 August 2018, at SKLAD and at Ancient Bath) is an exhibition accompanied by a series of talks, art interferences and performances.

The concept behind the two editions comes from the project curator, Dimitrina Sevova (Switzerland/Bulgaria), in collaboration with Katharina Swoboda (Austria) and Emil Mirazchiev (Bulgaria).


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Subcontracted Nations | A.M. Qattan Foundation, Ramallah​

Subcontracted Nations is a group exhibition that questions differing concepts of nation. In these times, we are seeing major transformations in these concepts through rhetorical and political discourse across many corners of the globe.

The exhibition draws its title from the proliferation of the processes of sub-contracting found in our world today―whether it is the sub-contracting of health services, or the privatisation of public resources including education. These processes have been instrumental in the fragmentation and compartmentalisation of public services and the diminution of the role and obligations of the state.

Another question the exhibition will pose is how the different forms of neoliberal orders in societies are being kept within socially and economically acceptable limits, in a manner considered optimal for preventing dissent and thus serving to maintain the delusion of social agency. The effects of these neoliberal mechanisms have become intrinsically entrenched in the production of day-to-day relationships, from family to sexual relations, to the status of citizenship and the structure of politics. This imposition of neoliberal mechanisms has contributed in numerous ways to the transformation of the individual through reformatory techniques, pre-designed lifestyles, dependency, and so forth.

Curated by Yazid Anani, featuring works by Ahed Izhiman, Ahmed Hamed, Alexandra Handal, Bashar Alhroub, Bashir Makhoul, Bisan Abu Eisheh, Dirar Kalash, Essa Grayeb, Habib Asal, Iyad Issa, Jonas Staal, Jumana Abboud, Khaled Jarrar, Lara Baladi, Larissa Sansour, Majdi Hadid, Manal Mahamid, May Odeh, Mirna Bamieh, Naeem Mohaiemen, Nida Sinnokrot, Noor Abed, Rima Essa, Sarah Beddington, Sliman Mansour, Taysir Batniji, Uriel Orlow, Vera Tamari, Vladimir Tamari, Waseem Fouad, Yazan Khalili and others.

Imbizo Ka Mafavuke and Theatrum Botanicum book launch | Whitechapel Gallery, London

The London premiere of Orlow’s new film Imbizo Ka Mafavuke (Mafavuke’s Tribunal), will be followed by a discussion between Uriel Orlow, Emily Pethick and Shela Sheikh and the launch of Theatrum Botanicum, published by Sternberg Press, with contributions by Sita Balani, Melanie Boehie, Clelia Coussonet, Karen Flint, Jason Irving, Nomusa Makhubu, Bettina Malcomess, Karin van Marle, Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll, designed by In the shade of a tree (Samuel Bonnet, Sophie Demay, and Maël Fournier-Comte).


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The London Open 2018 | Whitechapel Gallery, London

The London Open 2018 brings together critical and dynamic art that reflects on the experience of living in a global city now. This triennial open submission exhibition features 22 artists working across painting, sculpture, performance and video. With works by Larry Achiampong, Rachel Ara, Gabriella Boyd, Hannah Brown, Rachael Champion, Gary Colclough, George Eksts, Ayan Farah, French & Mottershead, Vikesh Govind, Richard Healy, Des Lawrence, Tom Lock, Céline Manz, Uriel Orlow, Rachel Pimm, Renee So, Alexis Teplin, Elisabeth Tomlinson, Jonathan Trayte, Tom Varley and Andrea Luka Zimmerman.


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Manifesta 12: The Planetary Garden | Palermo

Throughout history, the city of Palermo has been a laboratory for diversity and cross-pollination.  Continuous migration – from the Ancient Greeks, the Arabs and the Normans to the recent arrival from Northern Africa, South East Asia and the Middle East – has constantly redefined the city and its people. Palermo’s streets, architecture, parks, cultural legacy and personal histories are the result of a long-lasting syncretism of cultures across the Mediterranean and beyond.

Manifesta 12 in 2018 will also dialogue with the ephemeral components of Palermo’s life. Honouring the city’s long tradition of storytelling – or canta storie – through a series of new narrative productions about the city’s hidden networks. Recognising Santa Rosalia procession as a territory of contemporary syncretism, dialogue and celebration. Supporting existing initiatives to provide spaces for public hospitality. Mobilising its rich collection of archives to disclose untold stories on the city and its characters.

New commission presented in exhibition curated by Bregtje van der Haak, Andrés Jaque, Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli, and Mirjam Varadinis. Featuring works by Maria Thereza Alves, Jelili Atiku, Coloco & Gilles Clement, Cooking Sections, John Gerrard, Uriel Orlow, Khalil Rabah, Rotor, Marinella Senatore, Giorgio Vasta and others.


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Yinchuan Biennale | MOCA Yinchuan

The second Yinchuan Biennale “Departing from the Desert – Ecology on the Border” is conceived with the aim of measuring itself against a specific geo-historic context, and proposed as a form of minor language within the biennale system, Starting from the Desert seeks to respond to contemporary urgencies (not only in China) by adopting an “archaeological method.”

The Biennale’s framework is articulated over four, interdependent (and often overlapping) thematic areas that, without seeking to limit or circumscribe, attempts to visualize their material and immaterial aspects: Nomadic Space and Rural Space, Labor-in-Nature and Nature-in-Labor, The Voice and The Book, Minorities and Multiplicity .

Curated by Marco Scotini, with Andris Brinkmanis, Paolo Caffoni, Zasha Colah, and Lu Xinghua. With works by over 80 artists including Can Altay, Said Atabekov, Erick Beltrán, Alighiero Boetti, Filipa César, Emory Douglas, Duan Zengqu, Miriam Ghani, Raphaël Grisey, Silima Hashimi, Kiluanji Kia Henda, Hiwa K, Li Fenglen, Liu Ding, Adrien Missika, Pedro Neves Marques, Uriel Orlow, Kyong Park, Marjetica Potrč, Song Dong, Zheng Bo and others.


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CinemAmbiente​ Festival Cinema | Massimo, Torino

The films presented here, chosen from those exhibited at the Parco Arte Vivente in the last two years, investigate the antagonistic relationship between environmental activism and neoliberal policies on a global scale. Policies that, in spite of the imminent depletion of fossil fuels, continue to devastate vast areas of the planet, replicating exploitative practices that constitute a new colonialism and acting to the detriment of the dignity à and the rights of indigenous peoples of the North and South of the world .

Uriel Orlow’s films Imbizo Ka Mafavuke and The Crown Against Mafavuke are screened alongside works by Pedro Neves Marques, Oliver Ressler, Ursula Biemann and Paulo Tavares, curated by PAV Turin.


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“Reprendre”? | Centre Pompidou, Paris

The question of the restitution of patrimonial objects is currently hotly debated in a world which is a return to the European colonial past and which questions the origin of extra-European objects torn from their original context, as well as their exposure patterns in the West. Director Susan Vogel , an expert on African art, recounts the fast-paced and tragically burlesque journey of a Fang statuette through the 20th century, since its delivery to the West. In his film The Visitor (2007), the Swiss artistUriel Orlow goes to meet Oba Erediauwa, then king of Benin, to question him on the need to repatriate or not the famous bronzes of Benin preserved in the British Museum. Finally, the Senegalese videographerFatou Kandé Senghor films a Casamance artist-ceramist, Seni Camara, whose ancestral know-how is threatened with extinction.These different films help to question the fate and transmission of confiscated objects, all too often dedicated to museification alone. 

Uriel Orlow’s film The Visitor is screened alongside Fatou Kande Senghor’s work Giving Birth, and Susan Vogel’s film, Fang: An Epic Journey, followed by an in-conversation with curator Alicia Knock


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Infected Landscapes | M.1 Hohenlockstedt

Landscapes hint at demarcations and serve communities; are depositories of memories and states of being that allow us to make conclusions about the past and assumptions about the future; and are run through with or even constructed by computing and biochemical processes. Landscapes prompt desire and yearning. They provide an image both diffusely beautiful and alluringly disturbing. Landscapes and the shifts that occur therein foster critical reflection on the so-called anthropocene as well as observations on interaction between human and non-human players. The term landscape designates both a spatial situation and a symbolic construct; and each carries traces of multifaceted aesthetic, cultural, territorial, capitalised and subjective inscriptions. Landscapes have different effects depending on their context.

The artists’ contributions to the symposium and exhibition are a lens through which we will collectively review these constructs and discuss the extent to which we might consider landscapes to be impure and infected.

Curated by Joerg Franzbecker, featuring works by Filipa Cesar & Louis Henderson, Esther Kinsky, knowbotiq, The Many Headed Hydra, Elke Marhöfer & Mykhail Lylov, Uriel Orlow, Nguyen Trinh Thi, Sandra Schäfer, Kerstin Schroedinger, Virgilijus Šonta, Vangjush Vellahu, and Gitte Villesen.


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Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention | NTU, Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

Inspired by Tarek Atoui’s current exhibition The Ground: From the Land to the Sea at NTU CCA Singapore, this screening series features artist videos, documentaries, and filmic essays that examine how the image and the sonic create immersive ways for multiple sensorial elements to come together and form a singular space. Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention is further guided by the Centre’s overarching research topic CLIMATES. HABITATS. ENVIRONMENTS. by focusing on artistic interpretations that reflect our present-day ecology, bringing attention to global issues we tend to overlook, and by observing how we navigate different environments, particularly through aural perception.

The screening series features works by Robert Ashley (United States), Lawrence Abu Hamdan (Jordan/Lebanon), Melanie Bonajo (Netherlands/United States), Camille Henrot (France/United States), Alison O’Daniel (United States), Uriel Orlow (Switzerland/United Kingdom), Simon Ripoll-Hurier (France), Ben Russell (United States), and Nico Vascellari (Italy).


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