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Plant Echoes | Galleria Laveronica, Modica

In this exhibition, Orlow’s interest in how colonialist categorisation expunges indigenous systems of knowledge and belonging, took him to South Africa. Here, he found that not only did the British and Dutch re-name indigenous plants and try to eradicate as dangerous the use of herbal remedies, they also imported 9000 different exotic plants, many of which choked local flora. Orlow’s extraordinary new body of work uses plants as a potent lens through which to explore the socio-political, economic and spiritual ramifications of colonialisation.

Orlow focuses on the important role of medicinal herbs or ‘muthi’ in South African culture, with 60% of the population consulting a healer, who can choose from over 3000 plant species. With European pharmaceuticals exploiting the market for ’natural’ cures, a new front has opened in the contest of who owns what the land grows, has always grown. In ‘What Plants Were Called Before They Had A Name’ (2015-ongoing), male, female and collective voices recite the names of native plants in ten African languages, from isiZulu and SePedi to isiXhosa and Khoi, which had no legitimacy under a Latin taxonomy. ‘Language relates to politics,’ says Orlow, ‘and plant classification can be a form of epistemic violence’ In this sense, the surround sound audio piece acts as a restorative and moving oral dictionary.

‘Echoes’ (2017) is a series of photographs of dried brown sap stains on protective paper from botanical repositories in South African herbaria which date back to the colonial era of exploration. The tracings tell nothing of the traditional names or uses of the plants and highlight the imposition of a one-dimensional classification system that was revered as objective and unrivalled. It’s difficult to look at these frail residues, which contrast the tending delicacy of the botanists working amidst the cruel and murderous savagery of apartheid and colonialism before.

‘The Fairest Heritage’ (2016-17), poignantly intercepts a version of history. During his research, Orlow discovered a film made in 1963 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Kirstenbosch, the national botanical gardens of South Africa. Only three years after the Sharpeville Massacre and a year before Mandela’s incarceration for life on Robben Island, fifty international botanists toured South Africa, in a whites-only garden party. Orlow invited an African actor, Lindiwe Matshikiza, to interact with the projected images, delivering an elegantly silent addendum to the past, when the trade in exotic flowers evaded the boycott of South African goods till the late 1980s.

In this show, Orlow continues and develops his sensitive and pertinent re-working of histories, staging old documents in new settings, giving voice to those who have been muted to reconsider how agency can be re-enforced by art.

On 31. March at 14:45 there will be a film screening followed by a conversation between Uriel Orlow and Gabi Scardi at Cinema Aurora, Modica.


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Grey, Green, Gold (and Red) | Utopiana Geneva

Uriel Orlow will present a lecture performance Grey, Green, Gold (and Red), followed by the presentation and launch of two recent publications Affinités des sols | Soil Affinities and Theatrum Botanicum.

Grey, Green, Gold (and Red) expands on the themes and concerns of Orlow’s project Theatrum Botanicum (2015-2018), considering plants and gardens as active agents in politics and history. Following human-plant entanglements, Grey, Green, Gold (and Red) explores the role played by the garden Nelson Mandela and his fellow inmates planted on Robben Island prison during their 18-year incarceration, the implications of an ongoing battle between a flower and a squirrel, as well as the fate of alien species in Europe and South Africa.


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Postkoloniale Verstrickungen | Völkerkunde Museum Zürich

Der Begriff Postkolonialismus beschreibt die Auswirkungen von Kolonialismus, Dekolonisierung und neokolonialen Tendenzen auf die heutige globale Situation als verflochtene, reziproke Geschichte des Westens und des Globalen Südens. Das aktuelle Thema beschäftigt Wissenschaftler/innen, Künstler/innen und ethnologische Museen auch in der Schweiz. «Postkoloniale Verstrickungen der globalen Schweiz» lautet der Titel der neusten Ausgabe der Zeitschrift Widerspruch/72, in der konkrete Fallbeispiele beleuchtet werden. Wie lassen sich postkoloniale Erkenntnisse wirksam machen? Kurzvorträge werfen Schlaglichter auf die Publikation und auf konkrete Themen.


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Medium(s) | La Box, Bourges

Group show curated by Mawena Yehouessi with works by Alexandre Ikihide, Ali-Eddine Abdelkhalek et Emile Barret, Clara Noseda, El Popo Sangre, Elete Wright, Elise Voët, Ezra Wube, Ingrid Baars, Jim Chuchu, Jonathan Dotse, Justine Villermet, Kendario La’Pierre, Kodwo Eshun, Kwesi Abbensetts, Kyo-Hyun Kim, M.Y, Marie-Mam Sai Bellier et Clément Lemaire, Maya Deren et Alexander Hammid, Mirella Riccardi, Momoko Seto, Ndoho Ange, Nicolas Pirus, Nkiruka Oparah, Odendaal Esterhuyse, Raphaël Barontini, Romain Cieutat, Selly Raby Kane, SHRBR RPXR, Tabita Rezaire, Tifaine Coignoux, Uriel Orlow, Vincent Chevillon, Wendy Morgan.


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You never know the whole story… | Kunstmuseum, Bern

Group exhibition with works by Judith Albert, Max Almy, Hanspeter Ammann, Knut Åsdam, Klaus vom Bruch, Balthasar Burkhard, Dimitri Devyatkin, Herbert Distel, AK Dolven, Chris Evans, Peter Fischli / David Weiss, Kit Fitzgerald, Herbert Fritsch, Michael von Graffenried, Luzia Hürzeler, Ute Friederike Juerz, Jutta Koether, Jochen Kuhn, Muriel Kunz, Maria Lassnig, Les Levine, Mark Lewis, Carlo E. Lischetti, MadeIn Company, Cory McCorkle, Gerald Minkoff, Tatsuyo Miyajima, Irene Muñoz Martin, Muriel Olesen, Uriel Orlow, May-Thu Perret, Elodie Pong, Sean Scully, René Pulfer, Markus Raetz, Pamela Rosary, Christoph Rütimann, Francisco Sierra, Tom Skapoda, Edin Velez, Christian Vetter, Bill Viola, Anna Winteler, Camilo Yañez.


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