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Screenings

Imbizo Ka Mafavuke and Theatrum Botanicum book launch | Whitechapel Gallery, London

The London premiere of Orlow’s new film Imbizo Ka Mafavuke (Mafavuke’s Tribunal), will be followed by a discussion between Uriel Orlow, Emily Pethick and Shela Sheikh and the launch of Theatrum Botanicum, published by Sternberg Press, with contributions by Sita Balani, Melanie Boehie, Clelia Coussonet, Karen Flint, Jason Irving, Nomusa Makhubu, Bettina Malcomess, Karin van Marle, Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll, designed by In the shade of a tree (Samuel Bonnet, Sophie Demay, and Maël Fournier-Comte).


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CinemAmbiente​ Festival Cinema | Massimo, Torino

The films presented here, chosen from those exhibited at the Parco Arte Vivente in the last two years, investigate the antagonistic relationship between environmental activism and neoliberal policies on a global scale. Policies that, in spite of the imminent depletion of fossil fuels, continue to devastate vast areas of the planet, replicating exploitative practices that constitute a new colonialism and acting to the detriment of the dignity à and the rights of indigenous peoples of the North and South of the world .

Uriel Orlow’s films Imbizo Ka Mafavuke and The Crown Against Mafavuke are screened alongside works by Pedro Neves Marques, Oliver Ressler, Ursula Biemann and Paulo Tavares, curated by PAV Turin.


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“Reprendre”? | Centre Pompidou, Paris

The question of the restitution of patrimonial objects is currently hotly debated in a world which is a return to the European colonial past and which questions the origin of extra-European objects torn from their original context, as well as their exposure patterns in the West. Director Susan Vogel , an expert on African art, recounts the fast-paced and tragically burlesque journey of a Fang statuette through the 20th century, since its delivery to the West. In his film The Visitor (2007), the Swiss artistUriel Orlow goes to meet Oba Erediauwa, then king of Benin, to question him on the need to repatriate or not the famous bronzes of Benin preserved in the British Museum. Finally, the Senegalese videographerFatou Kandé Senghor films a Casamance artist-ceramist, Seni Camara, whose ancestral know-how is threatened with extinction.These different films help to question the fate and transmission of confiscated objects, all too often dedicated to museification alone. 

Uriel Orlow’s film The Visitor is screened alongside Fatou Kande Senghor’s work Giving Birth, and Susan Vogel’s film, Fang: An Epic Journey, followed by an in-conversation with curator Alicia Knock


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Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention | NTU, Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

Inspired by Tarek Atoui’s current exhibition The Ground: From the Land to the Sea at NTU CCA Singapore, this screening series features artist videos, documentaries, and filmic essays that examine how the image and the sonic create immersive ways for multiple sensorial elements to come together and form a singular space. Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention is further guided by the Centre’s overarching research topic CLIMATES. HABITATS. ENVIRONMENTS. by focusing on artistic interpretations that reflect our present-day ecology, bringing attention to global issues we tend to overlook, and by observing how we navigate different environments, particularly through aural perception.

The screening series features works by Robert Ashley (United States), Lawrence Abu Hamdan (Jordan/Lebanon), Melanie Bonajo (Netherlands/United States), Camille Henrot (France/United States), Alison O’Daniel (United States), Uriel Orlow (Switzerland/United Kingdom), Simon Ripoll-Hurier (France), Ben Russell (United States), and Nico Vascellari (Italy).


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What Happens to People and What Happens to the Land is the Same Thing | Le Narcisssio, Nice

Curated by Chiara Nuzzi, the project What Happens to People and What Happens to the Land is the Same Thing explores the role of art in ecological emergence, investigating its intersections with environmental commitment, political ecology and indigenous knowledge in relation to our modernity. In this frame, the works by several artists develop different cosmologies in light of the specific topic of reconciliation, an approach facing a de-colonial sensibility in the contemporary engagement with art.

The project is thus divided in three different chapters covering in turn an evening of lectures and screening program where selected video works will establish new powerful relations and crucial questions, followed by a video exhibition, and concluded by a collective sound walk in a botanical garden on the French Riviera.

Curated by Chiara Nuzzi, screening works by Ursula Biemann & Paulo Tavares, the Karrabing Film Collective and Uriel Orlow.


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Fragments as a Tool | Le Narcissio, Nice

Fragments as a Tool – Memory and Archeology in Contemporary art

This event, curated by Lorenzo Bruni, is a cross-reading about one of the latest trends in contemporary art: the use of archives and the archaeological method adopted by artists to reflect not on the identity of a society of the past, but on our present.

Films by artists Maria Thereza Alves, Rossella Biscotti, Uriel Orlow, and Ulla Von Brandenburg will be screened in order to create a moment of encounter, informal debate, and reflection upon this theme.


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There past the borders of nowhere | John Hansard Gallery, Southampton

John Hansard Gallery’s presents an evening of artist’s films in partnership with Southampton Film Week.

14. November 2017 | 7-9pm | FREE, booking required

Book your place HERE

The following films will be shown:

Shezad Dawood, Trailer, (2011), 15’00”
Uriel Orlow, Muthi (2016-17), 17’00”
Imogen Stidworthy, Barrabackslarrabang (2010), 9’13”
David Blandy, Child of the Atom (2011), 14’00”
Rosalind Nashashibi, Vivian’s Garden (2017), 29’50”


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