triangle circle square diamond

Exhibitions

British Art Show 9 | Wolverhampton Art Gallery

British Art Show 9 explores three overarching themes – healing, care and reparative history; tactics for togetherness; and imagining new futures, through four exhibitions.

Many of the artists in BAS9 investigate identity from an intersectional perspective, taking account of multiple identities that coexist such as class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. In Wolverhampton the exhibition explores these ideas in a critical dialogue with Wolverhampton’s cultural history which has been shaped by the diverse populations that came to work in its manufacturing industries during the post-war period.

BAS9 is curated by Irene Aristizábal and Hammad Nasar and includes work by over 40 artists.


External Link →

Requiem | mor Charpentier, Paris

The group show reflects upon the concept of ruins and remnants as elements that evidence political, ecological, social and human concerns with regard to history. Ruins tell a story, but they also provide us with doubts concerning both the past and the future. Through the works of Lara Almarcegui, Rossella Biscotti, Teresa Margolles, Théo Mercier and Uriel Orlow, the exhibition presents to the visitors the concept of contemporary ruin as a vessel of different ​​emotions and narratives.


External Link →

Butterflies Frolicking on the Mud | Thailand Biennale, Korat

Participation in the 2021 Thailand Biennale, Butterflies Frolicking on the Mud: Engendering Sensible Capital.

Curated by Yuko Hasegawa, co-curated by Tawatchai Somkong, Vipash Purichanont and Seiha Kurosawa and showing works of Atacama Desert Foundation, Maxwell Alexandre, Hicham Berrada, Bianca Bondi, Montien Boonma, Mathieu Merlet-Briand, Yanyun Chen, Liu Chuang, Sandra Cinto, Gohar Dashti, Charlotte Dumas, Olafur Eliasson, Jan Fabre, Yang Fudong, John Gerrard, Shilpa Gupta, David Hammons, Federico Herrero, Chris Huen Sin-kan, Junya Ishigami, Rinko Kawauchi, Keiken, Nile Koetting, Koichi Sato and Hideki Umezawa, Alongkorn Lauwatthana and Homesawan Umansap, Kwanchai Lichaikul, Make or Break, Haroon Mirza, Yllang Montenegro, Ngoc Nau, Krit Ngamsom, David O’Reilly, Uriel Orlow, PHKA Studio, PNAT, Pomme Chan, Akras Pornkajornkijkul, Boonserm Premthada, Herwig Scherabon, Sema Thai, Slowstitch Studio, Sim Chi Yin, Elias Sime, Eli Sudbrack, Som Supaparinya, SUPERFLEX, Mio Suzuki, Min Tanaka, Rudee Tancharoen, Tsuyoshi Tane, Zai Tang, Prasit Wichaya, YANTOR, Giacomo Zaganelli.

 


External Link →

Up Up Up | Kunsthalle Nairs, Scuol

For his solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Nairs, Uriel Orlow developed new works during several stays on site, through research and in exchange with the National Park in Zernez, which take up natural phenomena and place them in a global context. The focus is on the interdependencies between climate change and botany.

The warming of the climate is causing changes in our environment and ecosystems that affect plant biodiversity. Some of these changes and impacts are occurring more rapidly, are already highly visible, and are receiving great attention. Others, in turn, remain invisible for longer and escape attention. Mountain ecosystems, for example, face an interesting contradiction: the climate is warming faster than the global average, but the vegetation response is slower than expected. Nevertheless, plants – often thought to be immobile – are relocating their habitats to follow the conditions to which they are adapted.

In an exchange with the Swiss National Park in Zernez, Uriel Orlow developed new artistic approaches and aesthetics that reflect the transformation of regional flora under changing climatic conditions.

“Up Up Up” connects the unique local context in the Engadine and the Swiss National Park with the global issues of climate change.

By seeking dialogue with ongoing scientific research in the Swiss National Park, the project promotes exchange between art, science and the environment, and uses new visual methods to address one of the most important issues of our time.

The exhibition is curated by Sabine Rusterholz Petko.


External Link →

Fragments & Absences | Grand Palais, Bern

Fragments & Absences reunites artworks from the exhibition Exotic? Switzerland Looking Outward in the Age of Enlightenment, which opened one year ago at the Palais de Rumine in Lausanne and presented research carried out at the University of Bern. The exhibition, curated by Noémie Etienne, Claire Brizon, Chonja Lee, and Etienne Wismer (Institute of Art History, University of Bern), gathered 150 historical objects to tell stories of Swiss people who traveled outside Europe in the 18th century and engaged in various activities: collecting, sketching, writing, and producing imitation porcelain, lacquer, and printed cottons. The contemporary artworks gathered in Fragments & Absences question the notions of memory, absence, and survival.


External Link →

Earth Beats, Naturbild im Wandel | Kunsthaus Zürich

A major exhibition exploring artists’ engagement with the planet and its vulnerability. It considers both the history of ideas and future scenarios for the sustainable use of natural resources. ‘Earth Beats’ is an artists’ plea to preserve the Earth and its natural resources, born out of the urgency of the present situation. Nature, in the form of landscape painting, is firmly embedded in art history. In works from earlier centuries we generally encounter it as idyllic scenery, but since the 1970s it has been depicted with ever greater clarity as an entity threatened by human intervention and at the same time deserving of protection.

Curated by Sandra Gianfreda and Cathérine Hug, with some 120 works by Lothar Baumgarten, Vaughn Bell, Bernd & Hilla Becher, Joseph Beuys, Ursula Biemann, Nomin Bold, Laurence Bonvin, Herbert Brandl, Julian Charrière, Edward Theodore Compton, Gustave Courbet, Tony Cragg, Buby Durini, Thomas Fearnley, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Francesca Gabbiani, Ludwig Hess, Cornelia Hesse-Honegger, Ferdinand Hodler, Anna Jermolaewa, Ruth Kaaserer, Mikhail Karikis & Uriel Orlow, Armin Linke & Giulia Bruno & Giuseppe Ielasi, Richard Long, Marcus Maeder, Maurice Maggi, Ana Mendieta, Conrad Meyer, Johann Heinrich Meyer, Otto Morach, Harald Naegeli, Walter Niedermayr, Katie Paterson, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Oliver Ressler, Germaine Richier, Ed Ruscha, David Shrigley, Jules Spinatsch, Johann Gottfried Steffan, Annelies Štrba, Thomas Struth, Vivian Suter, Félix Vallotton, Auguste Veillon, Hans Beat Wieland, Caspar Wolf, Robert Zünd.


External Link →

Tip of the Iceberg | Focal Point Gallery Southend

This exhibition explores the relationship between art and alternative growing practices, which are increasingly coming together in pursuit of climate action and social justice. New and recent works by local and international artists explore three key themes: the notion of the ‘commons’, i.e. our common right to the earth’s natural resources (air, water, soil, land); how plants can be considered as both witnesses and agents across history, and how local hidden economies can act as catalysts for wider change. With works by Shaun C. Badham, Becky Beasley, Kathrin Böhm, Graham Burnett, Gabriella Hirst with Warren Harper, Anna Lukala, Mary Mattingly, Uriel Orlow, Rachel Pimm, Alida Rodrigues, Zheng Bo.


External Link →

Potential Agrarianisms | Kunsthalle Bratislava

Potential Agrarianisms sets out to diversify agriculture and pluralise its histories, recovering suppressed peasant pasts and activating their unrealised possibilities, destabilising urban-rural dichotomies, repairing the disconnect with the natural world and restoring caring and reciprocal relationships to the soils and plants that nourish us. Curated by Maja and Reuben Fowkes with work by Melanie Bonajo, Gerard Ortin Castellví, Anetta Mona Chişa, Annalee Davis, Ferenc Gróf with Jean-Baptiste Naudy, Oto Hudec, Marzia Migliora, MyVillages, Ilona Németh, Uriel Orlow, Prabhakar Pachpute, Alicja Rogalska.


External Link →

What the eyes cannot see | Kunsthaus Dresden

The exhibition What the eyes cannot see, the heart cannot feel is dedicated to the coexistence of humans with their natural environment. Around the world, landscapes and ecosystems have been and are still being changed by human interventions, while languages and cultural techniques have evolved in direct response to landscapes, plants and soils. Curated by Christiane Mennicke-Schwarz, Vincent Schier with work by Aline Baiana, Minia Biabiany, Kadija de Paula & Chico Togni in collaboration with FELL, Patricia Esquivias, Andreas Kempe, Antje Majewski, Silvia Noronha, Uriel Orlow, Lois Weinberger.


External Link →

British Art Show 9 | Aberdeen Art Gallery

The British Art Show is a landmark touring exhibition that celebrates the vitality of recent art made in Britain. British Art Show 9 was developed at a precarious moment in Britain’s history that has brought politics of identity and nation, concerns of social, racial and environmental justice, and questions of agency to the centre of public consciousness. The artists presented in the exhibition respond in critical ways to this complex context; imagining more hopeful futures and exploring new modes of resistance.

BAS9 is curated by Irene Aristizábal and Hammad Nasar and includes work by over 40 artists.


External Link →

Extractive Zones | Museum der Kulturen Basel

Human-environment relations are radically changing through the interventions of extractive industries and knowledge technologies. Against this background, the exhibition tests the critical dialogue between contemporary art and museum artifacts. Curated by Liliana Gómez, in cooperation with the University of Zurich, University of Kassel and the Documenta Institute.


External Link →