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2022

The Promise of Grass / The Gift of Dispossession | 5th Mardin Biennial, Turkey

Group exhibition curated by Adwait Singh with works by Abdessamad El Montassir, Almagul Menlibayeva, Asunción Molinos Gordo, Bhagwati Prasad, Bouba Touré with Raphaël Grisey, Deniz Uster with Burcu Yağcıoğlu, Bint Mbareh, E.B. Itso, Fatoş Irwen, Gülsün Karamustafa, İpek Hamzaoğlu, Jonas Staal, Kamen Stoyanov, Karan Shrestha, Kathyayini Dash, Lara Ögel, Marwa Arsanios, Merve Ünsal, Mikhail Karikis, Nandita Kumar, Neda Saeedi, Nejbir Erkol, Ömer Pekin, Rakhi Peswani, Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, Sasha Huber, Selma Gürbüz , Server Demirtaş, Sibel Horada, Thukral and Tagra, Uriel Orlow, Zahra Malkani.

With a focus on the Levant — the cradle of civilisation — and its allied geographies along the ancient silk route, the exhibition will see a gathering of over 30 artists from Turkey and beyond, representing around 25 countries. Their works bring the edaphic generosity of the region as well as its syncretic bindings to bear upon its fraught present. Spread across four main venues in the old town, with a few spill-overs, the exhibition will open to the public free of charge from 20 May onwards. Through the course of the exhibition border_less, an independent archiving and publishing platform, will be keeping a cosy reading space at Sahaf Kebikeç for those who seek an extended engagement with the exhibition contents.


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Teg bët gëstu gi | 14th Dakar Biennale

Group exhibition curated by El Hadj Malick Ndiaye and Emmanuelle Cherel with projects by Hervé Youmbi, Ibrahima Thiam, Uriel Orlow / Ariane Leblanc, Alioune Diouf, Patrick Bernier / Olive Martin, Ussumane Ca, Vincent Meessen, François Knoetze and Mamadou Khouma Gueye.
Teg Bët Gëstu Gi aims to stir up the metamorphic life of objects. Teg Bët Gëstu Gi in Wolof means ‘to see or touch with the eyes’ – research. Uriel Orlow’s new commission ‘Botanique de la more, botanique de la vie’ consists of a video and a garden and engages with artefacts from the collection of the Musée Theodore Monod which are intimately connected with plants: woven baskets used to collect plants, mortar and pestle used to process leaves and roots for medicinal use or sachets of plants worn by warriors to bring them luck… Objects that testify to our entanglement with the vegetal world and that evoke the spiritual and medicinal powers of plants.

Uriel Orlow exhibits for the first time the commissioned work Botany of Death, Botany of Life (video, 2020-2022). Outside the museum walls, in the garden, we encounter Botany of Care, a medicinal garden project conceived and developed jointly by Uriel Orlow and Ariane Leblanc.


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Before · Between · Beyond. The collection in transition | Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau

In Concert  by Uriel Orlow will be on view during the exhibition Before · Between · Beyond. The collection in transition in Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland. The Collection — the cornerstone of the Aargauer Kunsthaus — is growing apace, and today consists of over 20,000 pieces of Swiss art dating from the 18th century to the present day. In recent years, notable donations and loans — such as those from the Ringier Collection, the Federal Collection of Contemporary Art, the Walter A. Bechtler Foundation, or from patrons of the Aargauische Kunstsammlung — have contributed enormously to the outstanding importance of the collection in the European art scene. These additions, including many works by contemporary artists, serve as a source of fresh inspiration and form surprising associations within the portfolios. Spread throughout the gallery space, the exhibition describes new narrative arcs in three chapters, reflecting the past, questioning the present, and venturing a glimpse of the future.


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British Art Show 9 | Manchester

British Art Show 9 explores three overarching themes – healing, care and reparative history; tactics for togetherness; and imagining new futures. Each of the four exhibitions will also adapt to local contexts. In Manchester the exhibition will engage with the evolving nature of work and the ongoing struggle to shape a new social contract.

Manchester’s legacy as the world’s first industrial city was made possible by the mass exploitation of the working class – the subject of Friedrich Engels’s The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845). New ways to think, live and work emerged from this environment, including a spirit of resistance and community. These ideas resonate with many of the BAS9 artists’ interest in new proposals for living with social justice, care and healing at their core. The presentation in Manchester also explores how technology, and in particular Artificial Intelligence, is radically transforming how we work and connect with others.

BAS9 is curated by Irene Aristizábal and Hammad Nasar and includes work by over 40 artists.


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Border Environments: The entangled politics of ecology and migration


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Back of My Hand | Carpintarias de São Lázaro, Lisbon

Group exhibition curated by Sara Castelo Branco, with works by Basma Al-Sharif, Diogo Evangelista, Hugo de Almeida Pinho, Ismail Bahri, João Tabarra, Julien Prévieux, Nguyễn Trinh Thi, Oscar Santillan, Sanaz Sohrabi, Uriel Orlow.

“The hand was, in more than one aspect, our destiny”, said Elias Canetti. This apparent predisposition is manifested by the fact that the hand is one of the most symbolized parts of the human body – it’s an archetypal organ to talk about the process of correspondence between theory and practice, thought and materialization. On the other hand, gestures express both ancestral elements, and symptoms or traces of a given time, revealing what we can apprehend from our own contemporary condition. Considering this context, the group exhibition Back of My Hand is based on the way in which different artists work the poetic and political potential of hand, and its relationship with certain dynamics involved in the (in)visibility of images. In this sense, this exhibition presents a series of works in which the hand appears as a mechanism of action, revelation or performativity, aiming to question certain structures of knowledge and historical narrative, and to reflect about a tensioned space between what the image makes visible, and what exists in it in resistance and unintelligibility.


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Botanical Becontree | Becontree estate, London

Uriel Orlow has created three maps to celebrate the centenary of the Becontree Estate. Through the rich variety of plant life found on the estate, the maps tell stories of global migrations, cultural history and botanical remedies. Looking at Becontree through the prism of plants, we can trace rich histories of global connections and migrations, discover food sources and healing remedies for the body, and encounter stories of traditional use or cultural significance. The maps are available free of charge at the Valence House Museum & Valence Library (Becontree Avenue), the White House (884 Green Lane) and throughout Becontree Estate.

Commissioned by CREATE for the Becontree centenary, based on a botanical survey of Becontree Estate conducted by Denis J Vickers, a consultant ecologist living on the estate.


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Perfect Nature: Amstelpark Test Site | Zone2Source, Amsterdam

Perfect Nature: Amstelpark Test Site is a group exhibition and field experiment organized in collaboration with Neal White of CREAM/Westminster University in London. This project explores how local and indigenous knowledge relates to scientific methodology. What is the impact that scientific and visual classification systems of the natural world have on our relationship to flora and fauna? The artworks presented by Neal White, Tina O’Donnell and Uriel Orlow explore scientific representations of nature – which we encounter for example in the field of international trade in plants, plant medicines and soil – alongside local cultural knowledge in which other relationships to the natural world appear.


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Take Care Kunst & Medizin | Kunsthaus Zürich

Health is a timeless human preoccupation. The sensitive body is at once a working tool and object of observation. Taking their cue from works in the Kunsthaus collection, six chapters examine the productive interplay of sickness and pain, medicine, care and healing through 300 exhibits, over 200 of which are being made available by some 40 national and international lenders. Early examples date back to the 15th century, while the most recent are works from 2022 produced specially for the exhibition.

Curated by Cathérine Hug, with works by Panteha Abareshi, Ilit Azoulay, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sabian Baumann, Judith Bernstein, Joseph Beuys, Louise Bourgeois, Rachal Bradley, Stefan Burger, Sophie Calle, Sabina Carraro, Georges Chicotot, Honoré Daumier, Jean Dubuffet, Albrecht Dürer, Max Ernst, Adolf Fleischmann, General Idea, Michael Günzburger, Anna Halprin and Ruedi Gerber, Barbara Hammer, Christoph Hänsli, Duane Hanson, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Damien Hirst, Ferdinand Hodler, Andreas Hofer, Hanspeter Hofmann, huber.huber, Anna Jermolaewa, Hennric Jokeit, Fritz Kahn, Martin Kippenberger, Paul Klee, Herlinde Koelbl, Bruce Nauman, MANON, Michelle Miles, Shana Moulton, Thomas Müllenbach, Matt Mullican, Meret Oppenheim, Uriel Orlow, Herbert Ploberger, Maria Pomiansky, Marc Quinn, Arnulf Rainer, RELAX chiarenza & hauser & co, Pipilotti Rist, Ana Roldán, Pamela Rosenkranz, Corinne L. Rusch, Talaya Schmid, Kiki Smith, Veronika Spierenburg, Jules Spinatsch, Lucy Stein, Daniel Spoerri, Rosemarie Trockel, Luc Tuymans, Varlin, Andreas Vesalius, Lotte Luise Volger, Christine Tien Wang and Nives Widauer.

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Visual Natures | Maat, Lisbon

Visual Natures. The Politics and Culture of Environmentalism in the 20th and 21st Centuries is the result of more than two years of critical investigations around climate science, creative practices and eco-politics. This research project surveys political, social and cultural forms of collective agency that, over the course of the last one hundred years or so, demonstrate how the transforming human understanding of “nature” – philosophical, biological, economic – informs the ways in which we organise, sustain and govern our communities as an expanding planetary construct, both in concept and practice.


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Phytogenesis II | University of Plymouth

Building on the success of 2021 symposium in which transdisciplinary dialogue was generated around the newly enlivened subject of vegetal life, Phytogenesis II seeks to expand the field of enquiry by exploring more overtly political and activist nuances and provocations in the plant-philosophy-photography assemblage.

Climate change, and its devastating global effects, provides an impetus for this shift in focus, away from the instrumental and towards the ethical, allowing for ‘plant-human becomings and coevolutions to emerge’ (Aloi, 2018).

Organized by Dr Carole Baker & Marjolaine Ryley, with : Dr Prue Gibson and Dr Fabri Blacklock, Dr Giovanni Aloi, Dr Uriel Orlow, Nettie Edwards, William Arnold, Jamie House, Malcolm Dickson, Hannah Fletcher.

 


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Von Pflanzen lernen | Kunsthalle Nairs, Scuol

A transdisciplinary conversation on the relationship between humans and alpine nature in times of climate change, with Uriel Orlow, artist, Dr. Sonja Wipf, Head of Research and Monitoring, Swiss National Park, Zernez, Prof. Dr. Boris Previšić, Director Institute Cultures of the Alps, University of Lucerne, Dr. Andreas Weber, biologist and philosopher, Berlin, Sabine Rusterholz Petko, curator of the exhibition and Christof Rösch, Co-Director Fundaziun Nairs.

 


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Icone Vegetali: Arte e Botanica nel Secolo XXI | Museo Villa dei Cedri, Bellinzona

Curated by Carole Haensler with works by Alan Butler, Eduardo Kac, Suzanne Treister, Thomas Flechtner, Anne-Laure Franchette, Roswitha Gobbo, Uriel Orlow, Lisa Lurati, Gabriela Maria Müller and Ursula Palla.
The exhibition Icone Vegetali aims to establish a dialogue between natural heritage – in particular the plant species of the Museum’s park and, in a wider context, the herbaria, which are traces, memories to be preserved and documented – and contemporary artworks. By considering the different facets of the relationship between art and botany, such as the methodology of classification or the aesthetics of herbarium documentation, we aim to analyse the  cultural and anthropological aspects of the systematization of plant species – past, real, virtual or fictitious – and the impact of this perception on the relationship between man and nature.

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Kathmandu Triennale 2077 | Nepal Art Council, Kathmandu

Set to be the largest presentation of contemporary art in Nepal to date, KT 2077 is curated by Artistic Director Cosmin Costinas and Co-Curators Sheelasha Rajbhandari and Hit Man Gurung. The Triennale is informed by discourses of decolonisation, migration and displacement, indigenous knowledge, and redefining the parameters of art beyond a Eurocentric canon. It will discuss appropriate frameworks of understanding and bring together the multiple aesthetic and cosmological lineages active today.

The 2022 edition is curated by Nepalese artists and cultural organisers Hit Man Gurung and Sheelasha Rajbhandari, working with director Sharareh Bajracharya and artistic director Cosmin Costinas, and will include work by more than one hundred artists representing about forty countries.


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Košice Seed Library: Seeds that Move | Šopa Gallery, Košice

Collection of contributions by artists, curators, designers, gardeners, farmers and organisations from various parts of the world, containing actual seeds, conceptual seeds, artworks, spells, instructions, videos and sound recordings. Curated by Borbála Soós, with works by Elena Agudio / Savvy Contemporary,  James Bridle, Joélson Buggilla & Jorgge Menna Barreto, Sunoj D & Namrata Neog / Lakshmi Nivas, Sári Ember, Saskia Fischer, Oto Hudec,  Areej Huinti, Zayaan Khan, Jumana Manna, Emma Nicolson / Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Elia Nurvista, Uriel Orlow, Martin Piaček, Tabita Rezaire, Sara Rodrigues & Rodrigo B. Camacho / Landra, Vivien Sansour / Palestine Heirloom Seed Library, Ai Wei Wei, Ayman Zedani, Amy Watson / Pool.


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British Art Show 9 | Wolverhampton Art Gallery

British Art Show 9 explores three overarching themes – healing, care and reparative history; tactics for togetherness; and imagining new futures, through four exhibitions.

Many of the artists in BAS9 investigate identity from an intersectional perspective, taking account of multiple identities that coexist such as class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. In Wolverhampton the exhibition explores these ideas in a critical dialogue with Wolverhampton’s cultural history which has been shaped by the diverse populations that came to work in its manufacturing industries during the post-war period.

BAS9 is curated by Irene Aristizábal and Hammad Nasar and includes work by over 40 artists.


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Requiem | mor Charpentier, Paris

This group show reflects upon the concept of ruins and remnants as elements that evidence political, ecological, social and human concerns with regard to history. Ruins tell a story, but they also provide us with doubts concerning both the past and the future. Through the works of Lara Almarcegui, Rossella Biscotti, Teresa Margolles, Théo Mercier and Uriel Orlow, the exhibition presents to the visitors the concept of contemporary ruin as a vessel of different ​​emotions and narratives.


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